Is your marketing emotional enough

Is your marketing emotional enough?

Many thanks to Martin Lindstrom for his years of research in to Neuro-marketing which enables us to create this vlog. Check out his Book “Buyology” here 

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Is your marketing emotional enough?

Many thanks to Martin Lindstrom for his years of research in to Neuro-marketing which enables us to create this vlog. Check out his Book “Buyology” here 

Is your marketing emotional enough?

 

In 1975, Pepsi tried to prove to the world that it was tastier than Coke in what they called The Pepsi Challenge

Pepsi v Coke

To put it simply, this was a blind taste test. And they were right! Pepsi got the majority of votes.

Pepsi 1-0 Coke

But it didn’t really change anything – Coke was still top dog.

18 years after the original Pepsi Challenge, Dr Read Montague, using an FMRI scan of 60 test subjects, conducted the same test again…

Pepsi 2-o Coke

The results matched the original almost exactly. People preferred Pepsi in a blind taste test and according to their MRI, the activity in their ventral putamen (the area of the brain that is stimulated when we find a taste appealing) did too.

Then the doctor did the same test again. This time he told the subjects beforehand exactly what they would be tasting. And this time 75% of people claimed they preferred the taste of Coke.

Pepsi 2-10 Coke

The amazing thing about this was that Doc Montague noticed a change in the area of brain activity. In addition to our old friend, the ventral putamen, blood flows were now also registering in the prefrontal cortex – this is the portion of the brain that, amongst other things, is responsible for prior thinking and discernment.

 

Rational v Emotional, Neuro-Marketing

This essentially meant that 2 areas of the brain were involved in a tug of war between rational and emotional thinking.

And the emotional side rose up like a mystical beast and slayed the rational response until Coke became victorious.

 

The importance of emotion

All of those positive associations of Coke: the history, logo, colour, the childhood memories of the Christmas beat big bad Pepsi.

Why? Well, it’s because emotion is the way our brains encode the things that have value to us. So, the brands that can engage us emotionally are going to win hands down every single time.

So think to yourself Am I Coke? Or, Am I Pepsi? And: Is my marketing emotional enough?

Hang on, so you’re saying that the moral of the story is that you can sell any old sticky nonsense as long as you sell it emotionally? Is that really the moral of the story?!

Er, well yeah, really. That’s right.

You see Coke’s advantage isn’t how great its product is, it’s how great its marketing is. And you really need to get in on that action – even if you’re not a big brand.

Many thanks to Martin Lindstrom for his years of research in to Neuro-marketing. Check out his Book “Buyology” here 

 

Is your marketing emotional enough?

 

In 1975, Pepsi tried to prove to the world that it was tastier than Coke in what they called The Pepsi Challenge

Pepsi v Coke

To put it simply, this was a blind taste test. And they were right! Pepsi got the majority of votes.

Pepsi 1-0 Coke

But it didn’t really change anything – Coke was still top dog.

18 years after the original Pepsi Challenge, Dr Read Montague, using an FMRI scan of 60 test subjects, conducted the same test again…

Pepsi 2-o Coke

The results matched the original almost exactly. People preferred Pepsi in a blind taste test and according to their MRI, the activity in their ventral putamen (the area of the brain that is stimulated when we find a taste appealing) did too.

Then the doctor did the same test again. This time he told the subjects beforehand exactly what they would be tasting. And this time 75% of people claimed they preferred the taste of Coke.

Pepsi 2-10 Coke

The amazing thing about this was that Doc Montague noticed a change in the area of brain activity. In addition to our old friend, the ventral putamen, blood flows were now also registering in the prefrontal cortex – this is the portion of the brain that, amongst other things, is responsible for prior thinking and discernment.

 

Rational v Emotional, Neuro-Marketing

This essentially meant that 2 areas of the brain were involved in a tug of war between rational and emotional thinking.

And the emotional side rose up like a mystical beast and slayed the rational response until Coke became victorious.

 

The importance of emotion

All of those positive associations of Coke: the history, logo, colour, the childhood memories of the Christmas beat big bad Pepsi.

Why? Well, it’s because emotion is the way our brains encode the things that have value to us. So, the brands that can engage us emotionally are going to win hands down every single time.

So think to yourself Am I Coke? Or, Am I Pepsi? And: Is my marketing emotional enough?

Hang on, so you’re saying that the moral of the story is that you can sell any old sticky nonsense as long as you sell it emotionally? Is that really the moral of the story?!

Er, well yeah, really. That’s right.

You see Coke’s advantage isn’t how great its product is, it’s how great its marketing is. And you really need to get in on that action – even if you’re not a big brand.

 

Many thanks to Martin Lindstrom for his years of research in to Neuro-marketing. Check out his Book “Buyology” here